Your first digital camera.

rich.smith

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Joined
Dec 21, 2011
Messages
125
Kodak DC-210Plus with

* True "Megapixel" resolution (1152x864)
*
Excellent color
*
2x Wide-angle zoom lens (29-58mm)
*
LCD and optical viewfinder
*
Removable storage
Mine was the DC-210. Still have some of the photos in my Lightroom catalog. I shudder to think I paid more for that camera than my E-M1 and E-P5 combined.
 

Crdome

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Sep 11, 2011
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Albuquerque, New Mexico
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Michael
Apple QuickTake. 320x240 pixels should be enough for anyone, right?
View attachment 717852
That image came from Google; mine is long gone to the recycling centre.

But this is what it could do, in June 1996 (Ottawa Valley):
View attachment 717854
Don't click to make it bigger; that's all the pixels there were! And no EXIF data, either.
I’m old school too. I used the QuickTake 100 to document a museum photo collection of 4”x5” negatives and converting them to positives. It was almost always fethered to the Mac so the maximum of eight image storage wasn’t a problem.

The QuickTake 100 was released in 1994 as an easy-to-use digital camera that connected to any Macintosh computer by way of an Apple serial cable. The camera was capable of storing eight photos at 640×480 resolution, 32 photos at 320×240 resolution, or a mixture of both sizes. All photos were at 24-bit color. The camera had a built-in flash, but no focus or zoom controls. Other than downloading the photos to a computer, there was no way to preview them on the camera, nor was there any way to delete individual photos from the camera (though there was a recessed 'trash' button which would delete the entire contents of the camera). It was one of the first digital cameras released targeted to consumers.
 

Angus Gibbins

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Dec 6, 2015
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Brisbane, Australia
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Angus
You would've loved it back in the day. Besides taking pics, you were able to draw on them, add stickers such as noses, eyes, etc to make them funny and had mini games based on the old game and watch series in which you could add faces to the characters.
It had its limitations of course like black and white with only 4 shades of grey, very low res and a capacity of about 30 pics if I remember correctly with no way of taking them out besides printing but that didn't stop it from being plain fun.

I had the same problem with my first Fujifilm p&s from 2003. It even guzzled duracells. It wasn't till a worker friend introduced me to Energizer rechargeable batteries that my camera at the time would last forever.
As I said, any set of batteries. NiCad, NiMH, Lithium and Alkaline. NiCad and NiMH lasted the longest, but anything after the first recharge and they were useless (and yes I know how to train NiCad and NiMH batteries).
 

foxtail1

Science geek & photo nut
Joined
Dec 30, 2011
Messages
3,196
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Southwest Virginia
Real Name
Kristi
My first digital camera was a Sony DSC-P51. All I could afford at the time. Used those proprietary Sony memory cards. I think I got it at a Circuit City, if memory recalls.

View attachment 717933

At the time, I thought it was hot stuff, being 2mp and all. It was actually a decent camera considering the point and shoot competition at the time. Really, it as my one and only Sony camera.
I had totally forgotten about that Sony! I think that was my second digital. The first was a 1 mp Kodak. I think there were some others before I eventually graduated to the Nikon Coolpix P100, which was my last before the jump to µ4/3.
 
Joined
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Salt Spring Island, British Columbia, Canada
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Jan Steinman
The QuickTake 100 was released in 1994 as an easy-to-use digital camera… It was one of the first digital cameras released targeted to consumers.
And, as I recall, it was pretty expensive!

I managed to find a refurb a couple years after for less than half of full price, or else I wouldn't have purchased it.

Not too many years before, I worked at Tektronix Computer Research Labs. We were un-soldering and prying lids off of 16kb dynamic RAM chips and focusing images on them and reading them out! We even had a crude tri-colour filter wheel on a motor, and could do frame-sequential colour images. But it didn't come in as cool a package, and required a computer scientist… how things have changed…
 

mcgruff

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Joined
May 29, 2013
Messages
29
Location
Irvine, CA
An Olympus D600 L. 1.4 glorious megapixels. Not even sure when I bought it. '99? 2000?

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I took the shots with my Pen F so I returned the favor and shot that with the D600...yes, it still works.


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Joined
Mar 23, 2017
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Salt Spring Island, British Columbia, Canada
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Jan Steinman
An Olympus D600 L.
I had one of those!

I especially loved waiting ~20 seconds after turning it on before being able to use it, and getting used to telling the future: it took at least 200 milliseconds after pressing the shutter before it took the picture.

Rumour is that the Pro Capture feature of the OM-D E-M1 Mark II was for the purpose of "re-training" hapless D600L users who were used to pushing their shutter button too early. :)
 

gwydionjhr

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Nov 7, 2017
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785
Real Name
Joel
In 1990-91 I was going to Sheridan College in Ontario for Photography. Almost all of the work was on 4x5, but we had one class on digital imaging. The school loaned us either Epson or Kodak digital cameras that took 256/512kb(?) images. IIRC the teacher said they were over $1000Cdn each.
 

mcgruff

Mu-43 Regular
Joined
May 29, 2013
Messages
29
Location
Irvine, CA
I had one of those!

I especially loved waiting ~20 seconds after turning it on before being able to use it, and getting used to telling the future: it took at least 200 milliseconds after pressing the shutter before it took the picture.
That shutter lag is quite nice as well as the amount of time it takes to write to the card. In fact, my biggest challenge was figuring out how to get an image off of those old SmartMedia cards. I'm pretty sure I once had an adapter that would be popped into the floppy drive of my Mac.
No floppy drives around here anymore...so what to do? Then I remembered my old (and decommissioned) HP printer had a card reader. I feared that my wife had tossed it out during one of her cleaning purges but found it buried in a closet. Plugged the printer in, slotted the media card in place and connected USB cable to my Mac.... voila.....photos from the fabulous D600. Almost like going back in a time machine.
 

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