Show wildflowers, only wildflowers in the wild

melanieylang

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I am pretty excited to have discovered a new technique for shooting well-defined wildflowers in the field using a black shoebox to cut wind and create an uncluttered background. Though I didn't have a black shoebox, I spray painted one black, and attached a shoulder strap to make carrying it easy.

Today I also got great value from my new gardener's knee pads, which were full of tiny thorns from the prickly acacia I knelt on with previously-unknown gay abandon. As you can see from this selfie, I wouldn't win any fashions on the field awards, but I reckon they saved the day! Just before my battery ran flat, I remembered to try the stick method for bracing my camera hand, which worked so well I'll probably actually remember to do it next time - you can see that below, too.
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Bushboy

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A stick! OMG...
I just bought a flash as tripod, one that the centre column rises up and then hinges over to any angle desired. Such decadence! :)
Doesn’t stop the wind from blowing though..
Here is my first effort with it.. I think these are a orchid, with incredibly long stem, blow around crazily in slightest breeze.
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melanieylang

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A stick! OMG...
I just bought a flash as tripod, one that the centre column rises up and then hinges over to any angle desired. Such decadence! :)
Doesn’t stop the wind from blowing though..
Here is my first effort with it.. I think these are a orchid, with incredibly long stem, blow around crazily in slightest breeze.View attachment 781992
Yeah I'm hi-tech out here in the sticks (pardon the pun!). We don't have any incredibly long stemmed orchids here, I wonder what that one is.
 
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actually a stick works as well as anything, very useful tool
Those are absolutely beautiful photos. Really nice.

I called into a nature reserve on way home and found a few orchids. Apparently there was a blue one lurking according to a lady we saw but didn't see it.

I think these are:
Dark Caladenia
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Eastern Wallflower Orchid
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melanieylang

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actually a stick works as well as anything, very useful tool
Those are absolutely beautiful photos. Really nice.

I called into a nature reserve on way home and found a few orchids. Apparently there was a blue one lurking according to a lady we saw but didn't see it.

I think these are:
Dark Caladenia
View attachment 782002View attachment 782003

Eastern Wallflower Orchid
View attachment 782004

View attachment 782005
Oh that wallflower orchid is lovely - obviously a diuris species.
 

Bushboy

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Yeah I'm hi-tech out here in the sticks (pardon the pun!). We don't have any incredibly long stemmed orchids here, I wonder what that one is.
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Bushboy

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Convolvulus arvensis? (Though that individual's quite a bit more lavender than I'm used to seeing.) I'm not spotting Australian control guidance but California has rather a list of options.
Ours are exactly like Kev’s. I’m no expert, but I thought it was convolvulus. Purple flowers, easy to spot. I wage war on it with glyphosate and pull it buy hand. I have about 500 meters roadside boundary, it was infested, but I am winning the war. I did not know it as bindweed, but I can relate to that. It certainly binds up my nylon line trimmer, if I foolishly try that. Cheers for the links. 👍
 

archaeopteryx

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Might be best to limit an identification to Ipomoea as I think more details would be needed to disambiguate species. Brisbane weed has entries for I. alba, cairica, and indica with a similar block of text in all of them indicating some other Ipomoea species as well and giving diagnostics not visible here. Personally my guess would be more towards I. indica but I'm somewhat hesitant to go beyond Convolvulaceae on just this image.

We should perhaps move this elsewhere so as not to clutter the thread. We have guess the location and identify the object; it's maybe a little surprising there isn't an ID the plant.
 

melanieylang

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One of my favorite native orchids (possibly thelymitra ixioides), found having a nice time at the edge of a patch of scrub which was control burned earlier in the year.
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Bushboy

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melanieylang

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For those who aren't familiar with Australian temperate orchids, these are what I'd consider quite large and flamboyant compared with many smaller wildflowers. Here's my man's hand to show how little these 'big' flowers are:
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melanieylang

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A short, fuzzy-stem spider orchid (I don't know the correct name for it!):
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melanieylang

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Here's another spider orchid, conducting an orchestra:
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melanieylang

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According to Museums Victoria website, Trigger Plant (Stylidium) is widespread in red gum woodland, plains grassland, dry and valley sclerophyll forests and grassy open forests. When the pink flowers are gently prodded, the style suddenly flips over, facilitating pollination via insect visitors. It is found in Victoria, Queensland, New South Wales, Tasmania and South Australia.
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